Wordy Wednesday – “Hot-blooded”

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“I’m hot-blooded, check it and see/ I got a fever of a hundred and three/ Come on baby do you do more than dance/ I’m hot blooded, I’m hot blooded”

… And now that I have this Foreigner song stuck in your head I will disappoint you by telling you that the phrase “hot blooded” was actually coined by Shakespeare!

The phrase “hot blooded” or “hot bloodied” appears in two of ¬†Shakespeare’s plays, and describes a person or persons who have a passionate nature, or are quick-tempered.

In King Lear Act II Scene iv Lear says:

Return with her?
Why the hot-blooded France, that dowerless took
Our youngest borne, I could as well be brought
To knee his Throne, and Squire-like pension beg,
To keep base life a foot; return with her?

And in The Merry Wives of Windsor Act V Scene v Falstaff says:

The Windsor-bell hath stroke twelve: the Minute
draws-on: Now the hot-bloodied-Gods assist me:
Remember Jove, thou was’t a Bull for thy Europa, Love set on thy horns.

Do you know anyone you would describe as hot-blooded? Do you know any other songs that use phrases from Shakespeare? Post them here, and maybe you’ll see them in a future Wordy Wednesday post!

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